Interdisciplinary Introduction to the Social Sciences

Students must complete 3 credits in the area of Interdisciplinary Introduction to the Social Sciences.  The 3 credits will be completed by taking one of the following courses:

  • CORE 150:  Introduction to the Social Sciences
  • CORE 180:  Social Sciences in an American Context
  • CORE 190:  Social Sciences in a Global Context

Only one of the above may satisfy a Core requirement.

Social Science

Students must complete 3 credits in the area of Social Science.  The 3 credits will be completed by taking one of the following courses:

  • CORE 150:  Introduction to the Social Sciences*
  • CORE 153:  Principles of Economics:  Macro
  • CORE 154:  Introduction to Psychology
  • CORE 155:  Introduction to Women’s Studies
  • CORE 157:  Introduction to Sociology
  • CORE 158:  Introduction to Political Science

*Students may not take CORE 150 for Core credit if they have taken CORE 180 or 190.

Fall 2014 Social Science Course Offerings

CORE 150:  Introduction to the Social Sciences

An introduction to the goals, methods, theories, and research findings associated with the various fields comprising the social sciences. Topics will include: causes and consequences of individual and collective human behavior; the ways in which societies are organized; and the interrelationships of various institutions which comprise human society. Each course taught will focus on a specific theme as a focus of this interdisciplinary overview of the social science disciplines. This course fulfills the Core requirement for an Interdisciplinary Social Science course.  3 credits.

CORE 153:  Principles of Economics:  Macro

Macroeconomics:  The theory of national income, aggregate demand and the level of employment, money and banking, and government fiscal policy.  3 credits.

CORE 154:  Introduction to Psychology

A survey of basic core topics, concepts, and principles, including child development, learning, memory, motivation, physiological influences, stress and coping, personality dynamics, social functioning, abnormal behavior, and psychotherapy. Special emphasis is given to showing how psychology is applied to important issues in society, such as delinquency, child abuse, learning disabilities, crime and violence, profiling and forensics, managing stress, the widespread use psychotropic medications, addictions, brain injury, and "greening" the environment.

At the end of this course, it is expected students will understand (a) the research principles that make psychology a scientific discipline, and be able to critically evaluate statements about behavior; (b) the biological and psychological factors involved in cognitive and emotional development from birth to old age; (c) anxiety pathologies and psychotic disorders; (d) different counseling techniques; and (e) how to evaluate the use of prescription medication for treating mental disorders.  3 credits.

CORE 157:  Introduction to Sociology

The course introduces sociology's basic concepts, theories, research methods, and subfields, covering such topics as socialization, deviance and crime, family, economic inequality, culture, gender, religion, and social movements. Students will come to understand the many ways in which people's lives, including their own, are shaped by the social world, and the many ways in which human behavior and interaction serve to reinforce or challenge and reshape our social world.  3 credits.