CORE 140 — Foreign Culture (3 credits). An awareness of cultures other than the dominating Anglo civilization of the United States deepens our understanding of the diverse world in which we live and our place in it. When we step beyond our limited cultural surroundings and attempt to enter into the minds of others in the world community, we are often confronted with values and perspectives that both challenge our assumptions and broaden our understanding of what it is to be human. The liberally educated individual whose philosophy of life is solidly grounded in human and humane principles should understand cultural diversity and be equipped to deal with it in an informed and sensitive manner. Core 140: Foreign Cultures, attempts to present the student with as full an understanding of a non-English culture as possible in the space of one semester, in an English-language classroom. Topics broached in the Core 140 classroom include: the Geography and Political History of the nation or nations in question, its traditions of Art, Cinema, Literature, and Music, in the context of their historical development; native folklore, customs, and other social variables specific to the nation or region. Questions of ethnicity, religion and other topics that may reach beyond the borders of the particular nation (i.e. the native expression of Catholicism in Poland, Iran as an Islamic nation, the peculiarities of Communism in China), will also be discussed.

SECTIONS FOR FALL 2013: African Culture, Islamic Culture, Latin Amerian Culture, Polish Culture.

CORE 140: Foreign Cultures

Master Syllabus

Introduction

An awareness of cultures other than the dominating Anglo civilization of the United States deepens our understanding of the diverse world in which we live and our place in it. When we step beyond our limited cultural surroundings and attempt to enter into the minds of others in the world community, we are often confronted with values and perspectives that both challenge our assumptions and broaden our understanding of what it is to be human.

The liberally educated individual whose philosophy of life is solidly grounded in human and humane principles should understand cultural diversity and be equipped to deal with it in an informed and sensitive manner. Foreign language courses and foreign cultures courses taught in English provide this important dimension of a liberal arts education.

Core 140: Foreign Cultures, attempts to present the student with as full an understanding of a non-English culture as possible in the space of one semester, in an English-language classroom. Topics broached in the Core 140 classroom include: the Geography and Political History of the nation or nations in question, its traditions of Art, Cinema, Literature, and Music, in the context of their historical development; native folklore, customs, and other social variables specific to the nation or region. Questions of ethnicity, religion and other topics that may reach beyond the borders of the particular nation (i.e. the native expression of Catholicism in Poland, Iran as an Islamic nation, the peculiarities of Communism in China), will also be discussed.

Considering the very nature of the Core 140 courses, these classes must at once provide a cohesive look at culturally diverse areas while simultaneously avoiding a reductive and stereotypical view of the region or country in question. Recognizing that the Core 140 courses are in and of themselves diverse as they examine countries, regions, continents, and religions in a cultural context, in order to accomplish these objectives, Core 140 courses will follow either a country-study or a thematic approach. In the first instance, the course will focus on a particular nation and the manner in which that each national unit possesses characteristics specific to itself, along with supranational characteristics that link it to neighboring or kindred nations. In courses that encompass an entire region, it may be productive to use a thematic approach in order to describe regional trends, illustrating these trends with specific national examples. Thus, it will be the object of Core 140 to focus on a highlight the peculiarities of a particular nation particular nation, highlighting its peculiarities, in reference to the manner in which it can be considered a representative of a larger community or to select particular nations that illustrate a regional theme. For example, “Latin American Culture” is an overbroad term; a Core 140 L section should either focus on a single nation, such as Argentina, referencing from time to time the similarities that link it to, and the differences that distinguish it from, neighboring national cultures such as those of Uruguay and Brazil, or outline key regional themes and use specific national examples as a basis for discussion. For instance, a Latin American Cultures course might examine the evolution of the feudalistic structure, contrasting its manifestations in the Mexican Revolution and in Argentina’s conflict between the Pampas and the capital, between the “barbaric” caudillos and the “civilized” intellectuals of Buenos Aires. ; “Islamic Culture” is just as broad a topic as “Christian Culture” and should be approached in a way that appreciates the role that Shiite Islam has played in the development of the culture of Iran, while explaining the differences between it and the Sunni Islam practiced nearby in Iraq.

Although Core 140 is not a language-acquisition course per se, it is recognized that culture plays out most fully and viscerally in language. Thus, a brief portion of the course will be geared towards familiarizing the student with the history of the dominant language in the country of choice, its relation to English and/or other world languages, and the importance of the language to the development of national identity. Although Core 140 is not a literature course, the role of the written word in the development and maintenance of national identity will be exemplified by the consideration of one, or several, key works of the national literature in English translation.

Objectives

  1. To assess and appreciate with deeper insight and sensitivity the culture of a people or nation other than that of the English-speaking United States;
  2. to analyze the interrelation of the geography, history and cultural achievements of a people or nation other than that of the English-speaking United States;
  3. to compare and contrast the Anglo-American mode of thinking, creating, behaving and communicating with a foreign mode;
  4. to master a clearly defined body of knowledge drawn from the culture, e.g., from the language, literature, history, contemporary culture, etc., of a people or nation other than that of the English-speaking United States.

Goals

  1. To recognize the value of understanding cultures and languages different from one’s own;
  2. to study and consider with fairness and sensitivity cultural values, patterns and points of view different from one's own;
  3. to be better prepared to deal with cross-cultural contacts;
  4. to develop new insights into human and cultural values;
  5. to understand that language is an integral part of a national heritage;
  6. to develop a broader perspective on one's own language and culture by comparing it with another;
  7. to develop a global perspective from which to assess the political, economic and cultural interdependence of all nations.

Teaching-Learning Strategies

  1. The following definition of culture will be discussed: Culture is the way of thinking, feeling and acting characteristic of a particular people. It is a body of common understandings, ideas, attitudes, beliefs, values, symbols and behavior which act upon each other and are transmitted from one generation to another by means of language, traditions and institutions, while evolving in response to changing circumstances.
  2. Selected aspects of all categories of the contemporary culture of a particular people listed in the Topic Outline will be studied. (See Topic Outline below.)
  3. The geographic and historical factors that have influenced the development of the culture will be studied.
  4. Cross cultural comparisons, especially with Anglo-American culture, will be used.
  5. Assigned readings will form the basis for classroom discussion.
  6. Audio-visual materials will be used.
  7. A minimum of one writing assignment will be designed to develop the student's ability to analyze cultural phenomena.
  8. There will be a minimum of two tests including a comprehensive final examination.

Catalog Description

A study of the contemporary culture, values, perspectives and lifestyles of a non-Anglophone national culture, focusing on a fair and sensitive understanding of cultural diversity and appreciation of another way of life. The course is taught in English. No knowledge of a foreign language is required.

Topic Outline

Creative Works

  • Literature
  • Art
  • Music
  • Cinema

Communication

  • Language
  • Non-verbal Communication
  • Media

Geography

Ethnicity (majority and minority cultures in a given nation; the existence of a “diaspora” in emigrant nations outside the homeland (i.e. Turkish communities in Germany; Polish communities in North America).

Beliefs

  • Presence of World Religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, etc.)
  • Ancient Indigenous Myths and Belief Systems
  • Customs and Traditions

Economic, Social and Political Life

  • Economic System
  • Social Institutions
  • Political Structure
  • Family Structure and Social relationships
  • Recreation

Category Description: FOREIGN LANGUAGE, Beginning Level I

CORE 141 — Foreign Language (3 credits). Foreign Language learning at the most basic level, which does not presuppose a previous contact with the language in question. Students will explore: pronunciation, fundamentals of grammar, exercises in speaking, understanding and writing the foreign language. Readings introduce the student to the foreign culture.

SECTIONS FOR FALL 2013: Beginning French, Beginning German, Beginning Italian, Beginning Polish, Beginning Spanish.

Master Syllabus:

CORE 141: Beginning Language I

(French, German, Italian, Latin, Polish OR Spanish)

Core Category: Foreign Languages and Cultures

Master Syllabus

Introduction

An awareness of cultures in countries other than the United States deepens our understanding of the diverse world in which we live and our place in it. When we step beyond our limited cultural surroundings and attempt to enter into the minds of others in the world community, we are often confronted with values and perspectives that challenge our beliefs and assumptions. The liberally educated individual whose philosophy of life is solidly grounded in human and humane principles should understand cultural diversity and be equipped to deal with it with empathy and sensitivity. Foreign language courses and foreign culture courses taught in English provide this important dimension of a liberal arts education.

Objectives

  1. To assess and appreciate with deeper insight and sensitivity the culture of a foreign people;
  2. to analyze the interrelation of the geography, history and cultural achievements of a foreign nation;
  3. to compare and contrast the American mode of thinking, creating, behaving and communicating with a foreign mode;
  4. to master a clearly defined body of knowledge drawn from the culture, e.g., from the language, literature, history, contemporary culture, etc., of a foreign people.

Goals

  1. To recognize the need to avoid prejudice, provincialism and cultural and linguistic chauvinism;
  2. to understand and appreciate with empathy cultural values, patterns and points of view different from one's own;
  3. to be better prepared to deal with cross-cultural contacts;
  4. to develop new insights into human and cultural values;
  5. to understand that language is an integral part of a national heritage;
  6. to develop a broader perspective on one's own language and culture by comparing it with another;
  7. to develop a global perspective which recognizes the political, economic and cultural interdependence of all nations.

Specific Objectives

  1. To understand and speak the foreign language at an elementary level;
  2. to write simple forms of the language;
  3. to use basic vocabulary related to some of the common experiences of everday life;
  4. to pronounce the sounds of the language in a reasonably accurate manner;
  5. to begin to develop proficiency in reading the language;
  6. to gain some knowledge of the culture of the foreign people.

Teaching-Learning Strategies

  1. The following definition of culture will be discussed: Culture is the way of thinking, feeling and acting characteristic of a particular people. It is a body of common understandings, ideas, attitudes, beliefs, values, symbols and behavior which act upon each other and are transmitted from one generation to another by means of language, traditions and institutions while evolving in response to changing circumstances.
  2. The role of language as an integral part of culture will be emphasized.
  3. The material in a grammar textbook will serve as the basis for oral and written exercises designed to develop the student's proficiency in the language.
  4. Short cultural selections in the textbook will be read and serve as a basis for discussion of the culture.
  5. Foreign cultural phenomena studied will be compared with American to show similarities and differences.
  6. The foreign language will be used in the classroom to the greatest extent possible in studying both the language and the culture.
  7. Audio-visual materials will be used.
  8. There will be a minimum of three tests in addition to the final examination which will be comprehensive. At least one test will be given before mid-semester.
  9. Oral proficiency of students will be evaluated on an ongoing basis.

Category Description: FOREIGN LANGUAGE, Beginning Level II

CORE 142 — Foreign Language (3 credits). Foreign Language learning still at the beginning level, but building upon skills already possessed by the student, or acquired through the successful completion of Core 141. Students will explore: essentials of grammar and pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing the foreign language. Readings increase the student’s knowledge of the foreign culture. Prerequisite: CORE 141 or equivalent.

SECTIONS FOR FALL 2013: Beginning Spanish II.

Master Syllabus:

CORE 142: Beginning Language II

(French, German, Italian, Latin, Polish OR Spanish)

Core Category: Foreign Languages and Cultures

Master Syllabus

Introduction

An awareness of cultures in countries other than the United States deepens our understanding of the diverse world in which we live and our place in it. When we step beyond our limited cultural surroundings and attempt to enter into the minds of others in the world community, we are often confronted with values and perspectives that challenge our beliefs and assumptions. The liberally educated individual whose philosophy of life is solidly grounded in human and humane principles should understand cultural diversity and be equipped to deal with it with empathy and sensitivity. Foreign language courses and foreign culture courses taught in English provide this important dimension of a liberal arts education.

Objectives

  1. To assess and appreciate with deeper insight and sensitivity the culture of a foreign people;
  2. to analyze the interrelation of the geography, history and cultural achievements of a foreign nation;
  3. to compare and contrast the American mode of thinking, creating, behaving and communicating with a foreign mode;
  4. to master a clearly defined body of knowledge drawn from the culture, e.g., from the language, literature, history, contemporary culture, etc., of a foreign people.

Goals

  1. To recognize the need to avoid prejudice, provincialism and cultural and linguistic chauvinism;
  2. to understand and appreciate with empathy cultural values, patterns and points of view different from one's own;
  3. to be better prepared to deal with cross-cultural contacts;
  4. to develop new insights into human and cultural values;
  5. to understand that language is an integral part of a national heritage;
  6. to develop a broader perspective on one's own language and culture by comparing it with another;
  7. to develop a global perspective which recognizes the political, economic and cultural interdependence of all nations.

Specific Objectives

  1. To develop an active command of the fundamentals of the foreign language;
  2. to develop proficiency in communicating orally and in writing in a variety of daily life situations;
  3. to develop proficiency in pronouncing the sounds of the language correctly;
  4. to develop further proficiency in reading the foreign language;
  5. to expand knowledge of the culture of the foreign people.

Teaching-Learning Strategies

  1. The following definition of culture will be discussed: Culture is the way of thinking, feeling and acting characteristic of a particular people. It is a body of common understandings, ideas, attitudes, beliefs, values, symbols and behavior which act upon each other and are transmitted from one generation to another by means of language, traditions and institutions while evolving in response to changing circumstances.
  2. The role of language as an integral part of culture will be emphasized.
  3. The material in a grammar textbook will serve as the basis for oral and written exercises designed to develop the student's proficiency in the language.
  4. Short cultural selections in the textbook will be read and serve as a basis for discussion of the culture.
  5. Foreign cultural phenomena studied will be compared with American to show similarities and differences.
  6. The foreign language will be used in the classroom to the greatest extent possible in studying both the language and the culture.
  7. Audio-visual materials will be used.
  8. There will be a minimum of three tests in addition to the final examination which will be comprehensive. At least one test will be given before mid-semester.
  9. Oral proficiency of students will be evaluated on an ongoing basis.

Category Description: FOREIGN LANGUAGE, Intermediate Level I

CORE 143 — Foreign Language (3 credits). Foreign Language learning at the intermediate level, building upon skills already possessed by the student, or acquired through the successful completion of Core 142. Students will review and study further the fundamentals of the foreign language to increase comprehension, speaking and writing skills. Readings increase knowledge and understanding of the foreign culture. Prerequisite: CORE 142 or equivalent.

SECTIONS FOR FALL 2013: Intermediate French I, Intermediate German I, Intermediate Italian I, Intermediate Spanish I.

Master Syllabus:

CORE 143: Intermediate Language I

(French, German, Italian, Latin, Polish OR Spanish)

Core Category: Foreign Languages and Cultures

Master Syllabus

Introduction

An awareness of cultures in countries other than the United States deepens our understanding of the diverse world in which we live and our place in it. When we step beyond our limited cultural surroundings and attempt to enter into the minds of others in the world community, we are often confronted with values and perspectives that challenge our beliefs and assumptions. The liberally educated individual whose philosophy of life is solidly grounded in human and humane principles should understand cultural diversity and be equipped to deal with it with empathy and sensitivity. Foreign language courses and foreign culture courses taught in English provide this important dimension of a liberal arts education.

Objectives

  1. To assess and appreciate with deeper insight and sensitivity the culture of a foreign people;
  2. to analyze the interrelation of the geography, history and cultural achievements of a foreign nation;
  3. to compare and contrast the American mode of thinking, creating, behaving and communicating with a foreign mode;
  4. to master a clearly defined body of knowledge drawn from the culture, e.g., from the language, literature, history, contemporary culture, etc., of a foreign people.

Goals

  1. To recognize the need to avoid prejudice, provincialism and cultural and linguistic chauvinism;
  2. to understand and appreciate with empathy cultural values, patterns and points of view different from one's own;
  3. to be better prepared to deal with cross-cultural contacts;
  4. to develop new insights into human and cultural values;
  5. to understand that language is an integral part of a national heritage;
  6. to develop a broader perspective on one's own language and culture by comparing it with another;
  7. to develop a global perspective which recognizes the political, economic and cultural interdependence of all nations.

Specific Objectives

  1. To understand the foreign language spoken clearly and distinctly with familiar vocabulary and idioms;
  2. to converse on familiar social and cultural topics;
  3. to use the grammar of the language correctly;
  4. to speak the language with a reasonable degree of accuracy in pronunciation and intonation;
  5. to write simple compositions on familiar topics;
  6. to increase reading comprehension in the foreign language;
  7. to increase knowledge and understanding of the foreign culture.

Teaching-Learning Strategies

  1. The following definition of culture will be discussed: Culture is the way of thinking, feeling and acting characteristic of a particular people. It is a body of common understandings, ideas, attitudes, beliefs, values, symbols and behavior which act upon each other and are transmitted from one generation to another by means of language, traditions and institutions while evolving in response to changing circumstances.
  2. The role of language as an integral part of culture will be emphasized.
  3. The material in a grammar textbook will serve as the basis for oral and written exercises designed to develop the student's proficiency in the language.
  4. Short cultural selections in the textbook will be read and serve as a basis for discussion of the culture.
  5. Foreign cultural phenomena studied will be compared with American to show similarities and differences.
  6. The foreign language will be used in the classroom to the greatest extent possible in studying both the language and the culture.
  7. Audio-visual materials will be used.
  8. There will be a minimum of three tests in addition to the final examination, which will be comprehensive. At least one test will be given before mid-semester.
  9. Oral proficiency of students will be evaluated on an ongoing basis.

Category Description: FOREIGN LANGUAGE, Intermediate Level II

CORE 144 — Foreign Language (3 credits). Foreign Language learning at the intermediate level, building upon skills already possessed by the student, or acquired through the successful completion of Core 143. Students will work at the development of proficiency in reading the foreign language through the study of cultural texts. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and oral and written communication. Readings broaden the student’s knowledge and understanding of the foreign culture. Prerequisite: CORE 143 or equivalent.

SECTIONS FOR FALL 2013: Intermediate Spanish II.

Master Syllabus:

CORE 144: Intermediate Language II

(French, German, Italian, Latin, Polish OR Spanish)

Core Category: Foreign Languages and Cultures

Master Syllabus

Introduction

An awareness of cultures in countries other than the United States deepens our understanding of the diverse world in which we live and our place in it. When we step beyond our limited cultural surroundings and attempt to enter into the minds of others in the world community, we are often confronted with values and perspectives that challenge our beliefs and assumptions. The liberally educated individual whose philosophy of life is solidly grounded in human and humane principles should understand cultural diversity and be equipped to deal with it with empathy and sensitivity. Foreign language courses and foreign culture courses taught in English provide this important dimension of a liberal arts education.

Objectives

  1. To assess and appreciate with deeper insight and sensitivity the culture of a foreign people;
  2. to analyze the interrelation of the geography, history and cultural achievements of a foreign nation;
  3. to compare and contrast the American mode of thinking, creating, behaving and communicating with a foreign mode;
  4. to master a clearly defined body of knowledge drawn from the culture, e.g., from the language, literature, history, contemporary culture, etc., of a foreign people.

Goals

  1. To recognize the need to avoid prejudice, provincialism and cultural and linguistic chauvinism;
  2. to understand and appreciate with empathy cultural values, patterns and points of view different from one's own;
  3. to be better prepared to deal with cross-cultural contacts;
  4. to develop new insights into human and cultural values;
  5. to understand that language is an integral part of a national heritage;
  6. to develop a broader perspective on one's own language and culture by comparing it with another;
  7. to develop a global perspective which recognizes the political, economic and cultural interdependence of all nations.

Specific Objectives

  1. To develop proficiency in reading progressively more difficult cultural texts in the foreign language;
  2. to develop knowledge of the culture of the foreign people;
  3. to develop an appreciation of the relationship of language and culture;
  4. to be able to understand with greater facility the foreign language spoken clearly and distinctly;
  5. to speak the language with some confidence on topics of a cultural nature;
  6. to speak the language with good pronunciation and intonation;
  7. to use the language correctly and idiomatically in compositions on cultural topics.

Teaching-Learning Strategies

  1. The following definition of culture will be discussed: Culture is the way of thinking, feeling and acting characteristic of a particular people. It is a body of common understandings, ideas, attitudes, beliefs, values, symbols and behavior which act upon each other and are transmitted from one generation to another by means of language, traditions and institutions while evolving in response to changing circumstances.
  2. The role of language as an integral part of culture will be emphasized.
  3. A cultural reader will serve as the basis for oral and written exercises.
  4. Foreign cultural phenomena studied will be compared with American to show similarities and differences.
  5. The course will be conducted entirely in the foreign language.
  6. Audio-visual materials will be used.
  7. The use of a bilingual dictionary will be introduced.
  8. There will be a minimum of three tests in addition to the final examination which will be comprehensive. At least one test will be given before mid-semester.
  9. Oral proficiency of students will be evaluated on an ongoing basis.

Category Description: FOREIGN LANGUAGE, Advanced Level I

CORE 145 — Foreign Language Conversation and Composition (3 credits). Foreign Language learning at the advanced level, building upon skills already possessed by the student, or acquired through the successful completion of Core 144. Students will work at the further development of proficiency in the active use of the foreign language, both spoken and written. The course acquaints the student with the contemporary lifestyle, values and attitudes of the foreign people and increases cultural awareness. Prerequisite: CORE 144 or equivalent.

SECTIONS FOR FALL 2013: Spanish Conversation and Composition.

Master Syllabus:

CORE 145: Conversation and Composition I

(French, German, Italian, Latin, Polish OR Spanish)

Core Category: Foreign Languages and Cultures

Master Syllabus

Introduction

An awareness of cultures in countries other than the United States deepens our understanding of the diverse world in which we live and our place in it. When we step beyond our limited cultural surroundings and attempt to enter into the minds of others in the world community, we are often confronted with values and perspectives that challenge our beliefs and assumptions. The liberally educated individual whose philosophy of life is solidly grounded in human and humane principles should understand cultural diversity and be equipped to deal with it with empathy and sensitivity. Foreign language courses and foreign culture courses taught in English provide this important dimension of a liberal arts education.

Objectives

  1. To assess and appreciate with deeper insight and sensitivity the culture of a foreign people;
  2. to analyze the interrelation of the geography, history and cultural achievements of a foreign nation;
  3. to compare and contrast the American mode of thinking, creating, behaving and communicating with a foreign mode;
  4. to master a clearly defined body of knowledge drawn from the culture, e.g., from the language, literature, history, contemporary culture, etc., of a foreign people.

Goals

  1. To recognize the need to avoid prejudice, provincialism and cultural and linguistic chauvinism;
  2. to understand and appreciate with empathy cultural values, patterns and points of view different from one's own;
  3. to be better prepared to deal with cross-cultural contacts;
  4. to develop new insights into human and cultural values;
  5. to understand that language is an integral part of a national heritage;
  6. to develop a broader perspective on one's own language and culture by comparing it with another;
  7. to develop a global perspective which recognizes the political, economic and cultural interdependence of all nations.

Specific Objectives

  1. To acquire knowledge of the contemporary lifestyle, values and attitudes of the foreign people and increase cultural awareness;
  2. to gain further insights into the relationship of language and culture;
  3. to begin to perceive cultural phenomena as a native would;
  4. to read with a fair degree of understanding material of a cultural nature;
  5. to speak the foreign language with some fluency, making use of circumlocution;
  6. to engage in social conversation in the language;
  7. to write on cultural topics with a relative degree of clarity and correctness;
  8. to think in the language with a minimum of English interference.

Teaching-Learning Strategies

  1. The following definition of culture will be discussed: Culture is the way of thinking, feeling and acting characteristic of a particular people. It is a body of common understandings, ideas, attitudes, beliefs, values, symbols and behavior which act upon each other and are transmitted from one generation to another by means of language, traditions and institutions while evolving in response to changing circumstances.
  2. The role of language as an integral part of culture will be emphasized.
  3. A culturally based conversation manual will serve as the basis for classroom activities and written assignments.
  4. Foreign cultural phenomena studied will be compared with American to show similarities and differences.
  5. The course will be conducted entirely in the foreign language.
  6. Audio-visual materials will be used.
  7. Assignments requiring the use of a bilingual dictionary will be given.
  8. Students will be introduced to the use of a foreign language dictionary.
  9. A minimum of two compositions designed to develop the student's ability to write in the foreign language with a relative degree of clarity and correctness will be assigned and graded. At least one will be completed before mid-semester.
  10. There will be a minimum of three tests in addition to the final examination which will be comprehensive. At least one test will be given before mid-semester.